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Tandem biking instructor JoJo Smyth and eighth-grader Adara cycle together at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Fifth-grader Emily practices a move on Judo World Champion, Liana Mutia, at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Luis, a 6th grader, takes a mighty kick during beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Ella, a 7th grader, puts on the blindfold required to play beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Tandem biking instructor Megan Ahleman and tenth-grader Jaden go for a spin at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Pasha, a 5th grader, relaxes on the field before beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Ella, a 7th grader, raises her hand to answer a question about beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Ruth, a 6th-grader, wears bedazzled sneakers at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Erika, a 6th grader, catches the ball during beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Students practice judo at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a "Paralympic experience" for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.

Students practice judo at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Instructor and Judo Paralympian Ron Hawthorne ties the robe of sixth-grader Saifullah Tahirkheli at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a "Paralympic experience" for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.

Instructor and Judo Paralympian Ron Hawthorne ties the robe of sixth-grader Saifullah at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Peter, a 6th grader, holds onto the base during beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Pasha, a 5th grader, and Kristin prepare for judo practice at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Ellen, in 7th grade, and Ruth, in 6th, talk to a beep kickball instructor at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Tandem biking instructor Kate Dillsworth and first-grader Hugo Olsen take a lap around the track at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a "Paralympic experience" for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.

Tandem biking instructor Kate and first-grader Hugo take a lap around the track at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Elwin, a 7th grader, catches the ball during beep kickball at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Ron Hawthorne, a Judo Paralympian and Liana Mutia, a Judo World Champion, teach students judo at the Oregon School for the Deaf in Salem, Oct. 4, 2019. NWABA, the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, hosted a “Paralympic experience” for students with visual impairments in the state. After the Oregon School for the Blind closed in 2009, many visually impaired students and their families lost access to state-funded resources, like sports programs. The BVIS (Blind Visually Impaired Student) Fund gives programs like NWABA funds to enhance the lives of low vision/blind children across the state.
MADELEINE COOK / STATESMAN JOURNAL